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Killing Algae – Liquid v.s. Granular – Pond & Lake Q & A


Killing Algae - Liquid v.s. Granular

Killing Algae – Liquid v.s. Granular

Those of you with at least a couple years of ponding under your belt know that beautiful summer sunshine comes as a package deal with algae and green water. While it can be painful to look at for even a couple days, when your pond is being properly maintained it can be a quick and simple process to whip your pond back into shape.

Before you select which type of algaecide you want to use you will want to identify what type of algae you have. Algae typically come in 3 great flavors, Planktonic (green water), Filamentous (floating mats or string algae), and Chara (a smelly bottom growing plant-like algae). If you are not too sure on which type you have or you think you may have a submerged weed instead, take a look at our Weed ID Guide.

It is important to know what type of algae you are dealing with because it will help you select the proper algaecide for the job. Liquid algaecides like Algae Defense® are best used to contact spray floating algae mats, planktonic algae outbreaks, or to treat algae submerged in relatively shallow water usually 3 feet deep or shallower. Liquid algaecides are mixed with water and a Surfactant which is then applied using a Pond Sprayer. When dealing with bottom growing algae in greater depths you will want to use a granular algaecide like Cutrine®-Plus Granular or Hydrolthol 191 Granular . Granular applications are great for getting rid of Chara and, by using a Hand Spreader, are very easy to apply. If you have Koi, Trout, or Goldfish in your pond or lake you will want to use Clipper™ as it is not copper based. You can also benefit from the fact that Clipper™ works not only on weeds by on a variety of submerged weeds as well.

While both liquid and granular algaecides are great for killing existing algae, they will not prevent future growth. Properly maintaining your pond using Dye, Beneficial Bacteria, or Subsurface Aeration will help keep your pond healthy and reduce the chances of algae in the first place. Remember to always read product labels before doing any treatment.

Pond Talk: How successful has your fight with algae been?

6 Responses

  1. My problem is heavey growth of string and floating algae clumps on the surface of my pond and water fall during hot summer days. I literally have to manually removeing it. If I have to be out town for more than 3 days I will find myself spending half day to clean out the mess. I am already using salt to conc. 0.2% and using Pondclear and Muck away without much improvement. I live in the central valley were temp. get up to the 100 degrees frequently in the summer. Please advise. My pond does contain large number of koi fish. Please advise, thanks!

    • Hi Norman,

      First would be to evaluate your pond situation. Be sure you have sufficient plants for shade and to remove nutrients. Check your fish population and feeding habits. Fish that are feeing more then what they can eat in a few min each day will produce excess waste that can be difficult for the pond to remove in a timely fashion. I would also do a 25% water change just to get some fresh water into the pond and possibly use an algaecide to get a hold of the algae. Added bacteria will help to remove excess nutrients and fish waste. Last and possibly most important is your filtration system. Customers are always confused and clean their filters out as often as possible thinking a clean filter is more efficient. In reality you need the filter pads only to colonize bacteria to clean the water for you. You want to clean these as little as possible and only give a quick rinse when necessary if they become plugged. Start with these steps and if you are still having issues feel free to give us a call or send an e-mail.

  2. I harvest my algae and put in my compost bin.

    • John,

      That’s a great idea alge is very rich in nutrients. Many places are already starting to harvest algae for that purpose.

  3. Ciurrently I am using Alaqe Fix but it does not seem to control the green algea that is building up and the rocks and in the water fall areas.

    What do you suggest? I would like to get this fixed asap.

    • Hi Reg,

      First would be to evaluate your pond situation. Be sure you have sufficient plants for shade and to remove nutrients. Check your fish population and feeding habits. Fish that are feeing more then what they can eat in a few min each day will produce excess waste that can be difficult for the pond to remove in a timely fashion. I would also do a 25% water change just to get some fresh water into the pond and continue with the algae fix. Do you use any natural bacteria? Added bacteria will help to remove excess nutrients and fish waste. Last and possibly most important is your filtration system. Customers are always confused and clean their filters out as often as possible thinking a clean filter is more efficient. In reality you need the filter pads only to colonize bacteria to clean the water for you. You want to clean these as little as possible and only give a quick rinse when necessary if they become plugged. Start with these steps and if you are still having issues feel free to give us a call or send an e-mail.

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