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What type of soil is best for construction for an earth bottom pond? – Pond & Lake Q & A

Why type of soil is best for construction an earth bottom pond?

What type of soil is best for construction an earth bottom pond? Sarah – Charlotte, NC

Getting To the Bottom of Your Pond

If you are planning to dig an earth bottom pond in your yard this season, you may want to do a little leg work to find out what types of soil are found in your area before you break ground. You won’t need to go into specifics but your pond’s chances of success will depend on the dirt you dig up.

When digging your pond, it is common to pull up earth made of sand, silt or clay as well as many other components. If you built your home on land that was previously used for farming you would probably see a substantial layer of a fine, dark, nutrient rich soil. If you live in the southwest you may commonly find your property consists of mostly sand. It is important that you know the make up of your land because each type of dirt has its own unique characteristics and some hold water better than others. If you dig your pond in sand for example it will not be able to hold water. You really want to try to dig your pond in clay to ensure maximum water retention.

So how do you get the scoop on the local dirt? You can check with your city hall, or some local builders in your area, as they have at one point or another been involved with some type of digging in the area. If you can not find valid input or you want to double check for yourself, start digging in your yard. If you find that your yard consists of just about everything but clay, you have another option. Depending on the size of your pond you can purchase pond liner to hold the contents of your prospective pond. For smaller ponds you can purchase 45mil EPDM Liner. If you plan on digging a pond that 5,000 square feet and over then you are better suited with a 20mil PVC Liner which has a higher durability and comes in larger sections. If you’re in the market for a large pond liner it is best to call one of our pond techs to help give you an accurate estimate of the size you would need.

Pond Talk: Have you ever had trouble holding water in your pond?

Make your pond hold water with pond liner.

Can Koi and Goldfish Breed? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Can Koi and Goldfish Breed?

Can Koi and Goldfish Breed? Sheldon – Huntington, KY

Would That Make It A Koldfish?

Your fish have finally spawned and after what seems like eons of waiting they are starting to grow into full grown Koi…or Goldfish…or…what are they? Your newcomers seem to have unique new patterns and colors that are difference than their alleged parents, is it possible your Koi and Goldfish have crossbred?

While it is possible to crossbreed the two types of fish, it is fairly uncommon for the process to naturally occur in your pond. The outcome of such instances yields sterile offspring that are unable to reproduce. It is much more common to produce new colors and varieties of fish due to two different types of goldfish reproducing. While some pond owners are curious about the potential to crossbreed their fish, many more would be happy to just experience the spawning process even once in their back yard water garden regardless of the results. If it has not happened for you yet, make sure you are providing adequate habitat in the form of submerged plants so if your Koi do spawn the eggs and fry will have places to attach and hide to avoid becoming an easy meal (yes Koi will eat their own young). Furthermore, maintain a healthy water feature by providing adequate filtration, aeration, and beneficial bacteria. Using the products in a Pond Logic DefensePAC will give you a wide assortment of products that simplify your pond maintenance and promote a clean healthy environment. Click over to our Koi Spawning Blog for a little more insight on the matter.

Pond Talk: Have you ever experienced this phenomenon?

Water Hyacinth

I just installed a water garden, added fish and they died. What am I doing wrong? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

My Fish Are Nibbling At My Toes When I Swim. Why Is This Happening And How Can I Stop It?

I just installed a water garden, added fish and they died. What am I doing wrong? Jeff – Warrensburg, IL

Great Things Take Time

It feels great to finally stand back and take a look at your finished handy-work. A brand new beautifully decorated water feature full of crystal clear water. It looks so great you may even consider jumping in it yourself. So what wouldn’t your fish love about it? It is important to analyze both the construction of your water garden as well as the water quality before you introduce your precious pets into their new home.

An “ideal” pond set up places your pond at a minimum depth of 18”, in an area that is limited to a maximum of around 5-6 hours of sunlight a day and includes aeration, filtration and a bit of water circulation. This ensures that your fish will have adequate protection from harsh weather, and are being supplied clean oxygenated water. You will also want to make sure your new water feature provides enough of these amenities to accommodate all of your finned friends. So what if your pond makes the cut and passes your quality control inspection but your fish still didn’t pull through?

While we consider tap water healthy by our standards, your fish may tend to disagree. When filling a newly constructed pond for the first time, you will want to make sure you rinse off all of the materials you are using (your rocks and plants for example) to make sure they are free of any potentially harmful contaminants. Harmful materials can be added to the pond regardless of whether you fill your pond with city water or well water. Well water can sometimes contain heavy metals while city water contains chlorides and other chemicals that are harmful to fish. You can detoxify and remove these harmful materials by adding treatments like Pond & Fish Conditioner. The conditioner will not only neutralize the unwanted items from your water, it adds beneficial agents to the water body that improve the slime coat on your fish and increase their oxygen uptake resulting in happier, less stressed fish that are better protected against parasites and infections.

Once the pond is full and treated with conditioner you will still want to let the pond run on its own for a while to allow the water to commence its nitrogen cycle and balance. Without assistance the pond would take about 6 weeks to balance which, in our opinion, is too long. You can cut the wait down by adding PL Gel to your filtration media, using your Pond & Fish Conditioner, and using beneficial bacteria like Nature’s Defense. Purchasing a Test Kit will allow you an opportunity to watch the nitrogen cycle at work. You will be able to track the spikes in ammonia, nitrites, and pH, and make sure they settle down to acceptable levels. Read more about the nitrogen cycle in this blog. You can also introduce a couple small, inexpensive fish into the pond to help the pond balance faster and to test the water and see if it is ready for your more valuable fish. If your test fish do just fine then it is safe to add new ones to the mix. Try to add only 1 or 2 fish at a time to make sure your pond has time to gradually adjust to the increased nutrient load and to see if your filtration is up to the task of keeping the pond filtered and free of algae. Taking a little time when adding fish to your new pond will save you money and tears from lost pets. While you may be excited to stock your new pond, let patience prevail and provide you seasons of enjoyment with your new water garden.

Pond Talk: Did you have any complications when adding fish to your new pond? What did you do to remedy the issue?

Pond Logic Pond & Fish Conditioner

My Fish Are Nibbling At My Toes When I Swim. Why Is This Happening And How Can I Stop It? – Pond & Lake Q & A

My Fish Are Nibbling At My Toes When I Swim. Why Is This Happening And How Can I Stop It?

My Fish Are Nibbling At My Toes When I Swim. Why Is This Happening And How Can I Stop It? Holly – Wiggins, CO

…Or We’ll Feed Ya To Da Fishes

While we love hand feeding our fish from time to time, nothing ruins your day faster than taking a dip in your cool refreshing pond water only to be reduced to an overgrown chew toy. No one wants to swim in a pond where they feel they may be next one the menu, so how do you stop your touchy feely finned friends from taste testing you and your friends?

It is common to have the smaller prey fish in your pond try to make a quick meal out of your fingers and toes than their larger predator counterparts. It is a sign that your pond may be imbalanced, creating a shortage of food for your smaller fish. They are simply trying to find a snack wherever possible and that includes your precious phalanges. Keep tabs on your fish population to make sure you have a balanced ratio of 3 prey fish to every predator. If you have an abundance of smaller fish in the pond you may want to introduce some minnows into the water to give them a quick and easy meal that can be replenished over time. If your pond does have an unbalanced population, investigate why this may be. Make sure you have adequate habitat in the pond for your small fish to hide and mature and if you feel your fish are having trouble finding enough food consider manually feeding them using a quality fish food like Game Grower Fish Food. If you are not quite sure what or how to feed your fish read our Fish Food Blog. Also for some great tips on adding habitat to your pond click over to our Creating Habitat Blog.

Pond Talk: Do your fish nibble at you when you swim in your pond?

Pond Logic® Game Fish Grower - Fish Food

I see the little black tadpoles in my pond every year how do they get from tiny little tadpoles to full grown frogs? – Pond & Lake Q & A

I see the little black tadpoles in my pond every year how do they get from tiny little tadpoles to full grown frogs?

I see the little black tadpoles in my pond every year how do they get from tiny little tadpoles to full grown frogs? Troy – Demotte, IN

Anyone that has had a pond or is near water has probably heard the call of the bull frog. The low call heard that keeps us up at night, is from the male frog during mating season. Soon after, up to 20,000 eggs are laid and tiny tadpoles appear and begin their journey to adulthood.

Tadpoles will begin feeding on algae or other forms of plant life in their area but may also eat eggs or compete for food against other species of frogs if necessary. Since the tadpole stage offers little defense mechanism, many of the tadpoles are not able to survive, though not all are lost as there are a couple ways they are able to escape danger. Coloration makes it easy for them to blend in with surroundings. When you first walk up to the pond you may not notice them right away. At least not until you disturb them and they begin to swim. This movement is defense number two. Their small mass and quick tail allows them to swim hastily away from the opposing threat. If by some chance their tail can’t get out of the way quick enough, have no fear, the tadpole is able to just grow a new one.

As the tadpole continues to growth it will begin to develop eyes, gills, mouth and teeth to continue feeding. After some rapid growth spurts the tadpole can reach up to 6” in length before growing any legs. This process generally takes up to 3 years to complete.

Finally the legs begin to grow. The back legs start first and then the front legs. Now the tadpoles become more mobile, they lose their gills, develop lungs and a hard skeleton. At this point you can see the tadpole begin to take the shape of a frog. The last thing to go is the tail.

The growth process continues as the frog can now feed on insects and other tasty treats that may pass by until the coming spring when they too will join in the spring time calling.

Aerate your pond

Why do Koi (and Goldfish) Change Color? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Why do Koi (and Goldfish) Change Color?

Why do Koi (and Goldfish) Change Color? Colin – Sunbury, OH

You’ve now created the perfect pond habitat and begun to add fish. Multiple trips to the pond store scanning the tank to find just the perfect one to bring home. Some have spots, some red, some orange with black streaks. At least you’ve found the perfect one, black and white pattern with orange freckles on the face. You make your purchase and carefully introduce your new friend to the pond. Everything is going great until one day a few months later you notice that those freckles disappeared and the perfect pattern is changing to white. What happened? Did the fear of the heron turn him white as a ghost? Is there something you did wrong? Luckily, most of the time it’s nothing too serious. Let investigate a few possible causes.

Sun exposure: If you are in a climate where you experience a cold winter and your koi have been hiding out in your pond waiting for spring you may notice your koi are a little lighter in color once the spring time thaw sets in. This is common because koi do not receive a lot of exposure to the sun over the winter months. Once they get back into the routine and the sun begins to shine this color will usually return.

Genetics: Most koi come from parents that were not identical so the same rules apply. Some coloration is dominant and some recessive. This could also change with time the same way your hair color changes. Someone born with red hair may turn blonde or brown as they grow older. This is just a natural part of growing up.

Stress: Stress factors such as predators, parasites, water chemistry or water quality may affect coloration. A quick change in pH due to overwhelming organics or over population would cause a stressful environment which may cause a color change. Be sure to test your water, address water quality issues if necessary or treat the pond with pond salt, pond and fish conditioner or fish disease control. Watch your fish for behavior clues to determine if they are stressed.

Food: What type of food do they eat? Inexpensive bulk food may not contain as many vitamins and nutrients which may affect coloration. This does not necessarily mean the fish are unhealthy but they may not be receiving enough vitamins to support their color. Try feeding them food such as Pond Logic Growth & Color fish food, which supports coloration or even include fruits and vegetables such as oranges. Koi will love the citrus and this could greatly enhance their color.

Once you’ve addressed all these possibilities sit back, relax and enjoy your koi. The color may have changed but their playful personality will still be the same!

POND TALK: Have you ever had your koi change color?

Aerate your pond

Do I need a UV Filtration system for my pond? – Decorative Ponds & Water Gardens Q & A

Do I need a UV Filtration system for my pond?

Do I need a UV Filtration system for my pond? Benjamin – Dover, DE

Make Your Green Water Head Towards The Light

Spring is in full effect, the sun is shining, trees everywhere are in bloom, but now your pond water is as green as the grass that surrounds it. The water in your pond may have started off crystal clear this season but was it too good to last? Here at The Pond Guy we think not! If you can’t seem to gain the upper hand in your fight against green water it may be time to break out your secret weapon, a UV clarifier.

Some of you may be scratching your head at the idea of exposing your pond to even more light, but the truth is, when properly implemented, a UV bulb can work wonders on improving your pond’s water quality. The principal behind UV clarification is simple; expose algae to concentrated UV rays to damage and ultimately kill the plant. The trick to getting the best results from your UV clarifier is to pick a bulb that has a high enough wattage for your ponds volume and to pump the water past the bulb at just the right flow rate. All UV clarifiers are rated based on pond size. The larger the wattage, the larger the pond size the UV clarifier can handle. The other factor to take note of is the pump size. Pushing water past the UV light too fast can render it ineffective while pushing the water too slow can cause the UV Clarifier to act like a sterilizer, killing not only algae, but your beneficial bacteria as well. A great rule of thumb here is to push the water approximately half of what the UV is rated per hour. For the Tetra 9-Watt UV Clarifier that is rated for ponds up to 1,800 gallons a 900 GPH (gallons per hour) pump would be ideal.

The continued success of UV clarification has brought about many new styles of UV units; if you are currently building a pond consider purchasing a skimmer like the Savio Standard Skimmer which comes with optional built in UV. If your pond has been up and running for years you can use a Tetra Green Free UV Clarifier which installs in line with your plumbing, or the PondMaster Submersible UV Clarifier which can be plumbed in-line or submerged directly in the pond. There are even Pressurized Filters like the FishMate Pressure Filter 2,000 that come with a built in UV clarifier. Each type of UV is available in multiple wattages to best fit your specific needs.

While a UV clarifier can work wonders on your water garden it is only a patch to the real issue. Make sure you are properly maintaining your pond, using an adequate amount of filtration, and utilizing your bacteria products in your DefensePAC.

If you are unsure on How To Create A Balanced Environment for your water feature, or need to brush up on your Filtration Basics you can learn tons of tricks and tips on our Blog page.

Pond Talk: Which type of UV clarifier do you use in your pond? Has it made the difference between a pond full of “pea soup” and a crystal clear water garden?

UV Filtration

What does EcoBoost do for my pond and how often should I use it? – Pond & Lake Q & A

What does EcoBoost do for my pond and how often should I use it?

What does EcoBoost do for my pond and how often should I use it? Clyde – Willisburg, KY

Give Your Bacteria A Boost

Those of our pond guys and gals using PondClear and MuckAway have seen the drastic improvements beneficial bacteria can make throughout the course of the season. Using bacteria products regularly yields a cleaner pond with crystal clear water. In their strive for perfection pond owners everywhere demand better results in shorter time spans, so what if there was a product they could use to bulk up their bacteria, increase their water quality, and further ensure water clarity without having to sacrifice the usability of their pond water due to pesky chemical restrictions?

EcoBoost is a bacteria enhancer designed to stimulate beneficial bacteria, bind phosphates, sink suspended organic debris, and introduce over 80 trace minerals to your ecosystem to increase water quality and promote healthy fish. EcoBoost should be applied in combination with your PondClear and MuckAway bacteria for maximum results. Your bacteria will feed on the EcoBoost, giving them a boost in productivity, while other ingredients are binding phosphates, sinking them to the bottom of the pond. The organic waste can then be conveniently broken down at the pond’s bottom. EcoBoost can also be used to reduce the turbidity associated with the use of chemical treatments. Simply apply it 3 days after you apply your aquatic algaecide or herbicide.

The best part of using EcoBoost is the fact that it is completely eco friendly and has no water use restrictions. While it is not imperative that you use EcoBoost, it will enable you to stretch your dollar even more by making your bacteria more effective and keeping chemical treatments far and few between. If you are one of the many pond owners that demands even more performance out of your natural bacteria products or you are looking to further increase your water clarity, EcoBoost is definitely a product that should be on your must have list. For those of you looking to save even more money, and who isn’t, EcoBoost is bundled together with PondClear, Nature’s Blue Pond Dye, and Algae Defense in the Pond Logic ClearPAC.

Pond Talk: Have you tried EcoBoost in your pond? How has it helped the appearance of your pond?

UV Filtration

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