• Archives

  • Categories

  • Pages

Controlling Sago Pondweed – Pond & Lake Q & A


Picture of Sago Pondweed

Q: Sago Pondweed is taking over our pond! What can I do to get rid of it? - Sue of DePere, WI

A: We are hearing more and more customers having an issue with pondweeds that are taking over their ponds. One we hear a lot about so far this year is Sago Pondweed. The Texas AgriLife Extension Service describes Sago Pondweed as:

“[…] a perennial plant that arises from thickly matted rhizomes and has no floating leaves. The stems are thin, long and highly branching with leaves very thin and filament-like, about 1/16 of an inch wide and 2 to over 12 inches long tapering to a point. The leaves grow in thick layers and originate from a sheath. The fruit is nut-like 1/8 to 1/4 inches long and 1/10 to 1/8 inches wide.”

There are a couple ways to treat Sago Pondweed. These solutions will not only treat Sago Pondweed but also a majority of other pondweeds as well.

For spot treatments, the best product to use is Ultra PondWeed Defense®. Its fast acting and works very well. One quart of Ultra Pondweed Defense® will treat up to 5,000 square feet of Sago PondWeed.

If Sago Pondweed is getting out of control, then the best product to use is Sonar™ A.S.. Sonar™ A.S. is a long-term solution and will treat the whole body of water. One 8 oz bottle will treat up to a 1/4 acre pond with an average depth of 4′.

After the Sago Pondweed has died off, it is very important to rake it out. If the dead vegetation stays on the bottom of the pond, over time it will break down into “muck” and create more food source for other algae and
pondweeds. The Easy to Use Pond & Beach Rake is a great tool to accomplish this.

2 Responses

  1. Ducks may keep the sago pondweed trimmed, but the other factor you have to worry about with ducks is that they excrete a lot of waste. This waste will increase the nutrient levels in the pond and in time cause more algae and pondweed growth.

  2. We were told this week to get a few ducks for our pond and they will get rid of the sago pondweed in short order. Can you tell me if this is true? Thanks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 142 other followers

%d bloggers like this: